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  • MCCL

Protection for newborns would be repealed by Minnesota House omnibus bill

March 27, 2023 | Press Release


ST. PAUL — The newly introduced health omnibus bill in the Minnesota House (HF 2930) would repeal a measure protecting babies who are already born. If the bill became law, Minnesota would not require efforts “to preserve the life and health” of any baby born alive, whether or not they were born after surviving an abortion.


“This appalling bill would allow infants to be left to die. And not just babies who have survived abortion, but any babies whatsoever who are born and alive,” said MCCL Co-Executive Director Cathy Blaeser. “It especially puts babies with disabilities at grave risk. These infants could just be given comfort care and denied the essential care that would save their lives.”


Existing Minnesota law states, with regard to infants born as a result of an abortion, that “all reasonable measures consistent with good medical practice, including the compilation of appropriate medical records, shall be taken by the responsible medical personnel to preserve the life and health of the born alive infant” (section 145.423, subdivision 1). The House bill would repeal the requirement “to preserve the life and health of the born alive infant,” replacing it with a requirement for “care,” which could simply mean comfort care while a child is allowed to die.


Moreover, the omnibus bill strips out the specification that the babies in question are ones who survive abortion, instead applying the text to any baby who is born alive. That means any viable born babies, whether born as a result of abortion or not, could be denied lifesaving care.


“The House health omnibus bill is extreme, callous, and goes far beyond abortion-up-to-birth,” said Blaeser. “We are talking about newborn babies. This bill would put into Minnesota law former Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s infamous proposal to let born babies die.”


The omnibus bill would also repeal Minnesota’s ban on taxpayer funding of abortion through Medicaid (which was stricken by a court) and Minnesota’s ban on abortion funding under Minnesota Care (which has not been stricken and is still law). Similar language is included in HF 91/SF 70, a bill that would repeal numerous longstanding abortion laws.

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