• MCCL

MCCL marks 50 years of saving lives

ST. PAUL — Today marks the 50th anniversary of the incorporation of Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life (MCCL), Minnesota's oldest and largest pro-life organization.

"Through MCCL's work over the last five decades, hearts and minds have been changed, laws have been enacted, and lives have been saved," says MCCL President Leo LaLonde. "And it has only been possible because of the faithful support and dedication of thousands and thousands of pro-life Minnesotans."


On June 12, 1968, a small group of Minnesotans who were concerned for life formed an organization to oppose legalized abortion and defend the right to life of every member of the human family. Since then, MCCL has worked through education, legislation, and political action to secure protection for innocent human life from abortion, infanticide, euthanasia and assisted suicide, and embryo-destructive research.

MCCL's educational activities and events have reached citizens with the message of the humanity of the unborn child and the inhumanity of abortion. MCCL's work at the Legislature has led to enactment of numerous pro-life laws that have helped reduce abortions and save lives. MCCL's two political action committees have helped elect candidates to office who have enacted lifesaving laws and policies.

"Abortions in Minnesota have dropped almost 50 percent since 1980," says LaLonde. "But nearly 10,000 unborn children are still killed here each year, and assisted suicide is a continuing threat. There is still a lot of work to do."

MCCL celebrated its anniversary with a special reception on June 7 at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul. Attendees included many members and friends of MCCL, including elected officials, former Gov. Tim Pawlenty, and current Lt. Gov. Michelle Fischbach. (Watch a video and see photos from the event.)

"Fifty years later, we're not going anywhere," concludes LaLonde. "MCCL's work to defend those who need defending is as important now as ever."

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